Good Morning CSA Members,
 
Today, Wednesday, December 2nd is a winter share pick up! Distribution is from 3pm-6:30pm here at the farm, 7450 Valmont Rd, Boulder. Next week, Dec. 9th is our final Winter CSA Share distribution of the season! Details regarding our 2016 CSA registration are below as well.
 
 
We look forward to seeing you tonight,
 
Farmer Anne
 
Notes From The Field
 

    It is not uncommon for you, me or any other human at this time of year to want to join the many other species of this planet in the annual practice of hibernation.  It is precisely what the carrots and parsnips are doing right at this very moment under the duvet of snow and if it were not for the  blissfull pleasure that snow gives them, the piglets would probably join us as well.
 
    The turning of the calender page to the festive month of December always creates an urgency. Only one more month left.  It all is a sales pitch from nature, quick before it is all gone!
 
    Now it is a field of Christmas trees that we see across the street at Munson's rather than a patch of corn.  The wreaths and ribbons are yearning to be displayed in full regalia.  The monochrome valley is heartbreakingly beautiful with the pines of Chatauqua tossing flakes of confetti into the air and the diamond like snowbanks glistening within the sunlight.
 
    The quiet of evening is a soundtrack like no other.  The clank of a trough top echoes at midnight (do pigs ever stop eating?).  The balk of a frigid hen, the harsh laugh of a gander and all the leaves frozen upon the grass.  The trees are embarassed, the interns scattered, the blanket of winter is unfolding upon us.
 
    The tree will make it's way indoors following you through the open back door as it too is needing some warmth and  asking for decoration.  So prepare the floors for footprints wet with frost and scented of pine.  The carols are not far away now.
 
In Your Share This Week
  • salad greens
  • parsnips
  • carrots
  • rutabaga
  • onions
  • red potatoes
  • dry beans
  • butternut squash
  • pie pumpkin
Bread Share: Next week
Coming Next Week: Last Week! winter squash, greens, carrots, potatoes, rutabaga, turnips, dry beans, and more...
 
Recipes
 
For more recipes please check out our CSA Recipe webpage.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 CSA Registration
 It is time to start thinking about our 2016 CSA season. As an existing member you can register for your share now for 2016.  
 
 
        
 
Existing members may register for their CSA share through January 5th.  Any remaining shares will become available to the public on January 15th. For full CSA details visit our website.
 
 
Important Dates
  • 2016 CSA Registration, begins today for existing members, 12/2/15-1/8/16
  • Winter Market, 12/5 & 12/6, Boulder County Fairgrounds, Longmont
  • Last Winter CSA Pick-up, 12/9
  • Farm Store closes for the season, 12/13
 
Words to Live By
   “For life is the best thing we have in
  this existence. And if we should  
 desire to believe in something, it    
  should be a beacon within. This  
beacon being the sun, sea, and sky,
our children, our work, our
companions and, most simply put,
the embodiment of love.”
 
 
-Patti Smith
 
 
 
 
Around The Farm

Above: Dry beans just after shelling.
    
     It is dry bean time on the farm! This season we grew calypso, vermont cranberry and jacob's cattle beans.  While conventionally this crop is harvested and shelled with a combine, we are still harvesting and shelling by hand, and foot in some cases. These beans will make great soups and stews and are just stunning as well.  We hope you enjoy! 
  
 
 



Cure Organic Farm

7416 Valmont Rd.
Boulder, CO 80301
cureorganicfarm@yahoo.com
www.cureorganicfarm.com
Recipes
Frijoles de Olla (Diana Kennedy, The Art of Mexican Cooking)
  Yield: Makes about 3½ to 4 cups

Ingredients

  • ½ pound dry beans
  • ¼ white onion; roughly sliced
  • 1 heaped tablespoon lard (we prefer mangalitsa!)
  • Sea salt to taste

Directions

Run the beans through your hands to pick out any small stones or pieces of earth, which can be found as proof of recently being harvested. Rinse twice in cold water and drain. Put into a bean pot and cover with enough hot water to come at least 3 inches above the beans. Add the onion and lard and bring to a simmer. Continue simmering until the skins of the beans are soft, then add the salt and continue cooking until the beans are very soft and the broth soupy (see Notes).
Frijoles de olla are usually served alone at the end of the main course, sometimes on the same plate and mopped up with a tortilla, or often in a small bowl apart.
Do not soak the beans first; the skin gives off an unpleasant flavor. If you do, then don’t throw out the soaking water with all the minerals and flavor. Instead throw out the book that tells you to do so.
Do not add the salt until the skins of the beans are soft; some Mexican cooks will say that the skins will toughen.
Always use the bean broth-again, throw out the book that tells you to discard it (believe it or not, I have seen these instructions).
Do not leave the beans at room temperature for any length of time; they ferment easily.

Rutabaga a la Greque (Alice Waters, The Art of Simple Food)
  • 1 large or 2 small rutabagas (about 1 pound)
  • 3 cups water
  • 3/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 1 hefty pinches peppercorns
  • 1 hefty pinches coriander seeds
  • 1 hefty pinches mustard seeds
  • 2 large (or 4 small) cloves of garlic, peeled and halved
  • 2 chile pods
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • 4 marjoram sprigs (or 1 pinch dried marjoram)
  • Salt
  1. Peel the rutabagas, then cut them into 1/4-inch slices. If you want a little more stability, cut them in half and then slice them into half-moons.
  2. Measure all other ingredients into a medium-size pot. Add enough salt so the liquid tastes salty (but not inedible) -- one generous pinch is a good start. Bring everything to a boil, then simmer for 3 minutes. Be warned: your kitchen will smell like vinegar.
  3. Add the rutabaga slices, trying to get all of them submerged. Cook them until they're tender, but not too soft -- a knife should pierce them easily but you don't want them to fall apart. This should take about 15 minutes.
  4. Let the slices cool in the liquid. Serve as is, or drizzled with salsa verde -- Alice says they're better the next day, and I agree. You can store them in the liquid for up to a week or so.
  5. Note: You can really put anything you like into the cooking liquid. Experiment with other herbs and spices, like fennel seeds, bay leaves, ginger, etc.
 

Parsnip & Ginger Soup (Jamie Oliver)

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 pounds parsnips
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 2cm piece root ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 2pts vegetable stock
  • 3 tbsp creme fraîche
  • to serve: chopped parsley and a little ground paprika
1 Heat the oil in a large pan, add the onion and saute for 3-4mins or until pale golden. Meanwhile, wash the parsnips, trim the ends and chop them into even sized chunks.

2 Add the parsnips to the pan along with the garlic and ginger, saute for 2 mins, stirring. Pour in the stock and a little seasoning. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 20-25 mins or until the parsnips are tender.

3 Use a stick blender to puree the soup until its nice and smooth. Add the creme fraîche and taste for seasoning. Serve hot in bowls, sprinkled with a little parsley or paprika if liked.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf
Beans are an incredibly versatile ingredient, but if you buy them dry, there are four steps you must take before you can enjoy their great flavor as well as their incredible nutrition and health benefits.
  1. Clean
  2. Rinse
  3. Soak
  4. Cook

Clean Your Beans

Clean your beans of any debris by placing them in a pie plate or bar pan. Discard any foreign objects like leaves, small stones or twigs as well as any broken beans.

Rinse Your Beans

After inspecting and cleaning your beans place them in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf

Soak Your Beans

It’s important to soak your beans before cooking them. Soaking has two major benefits: It reduces the cooking time and it breaks down the compounds in beans that cause flatulence. The longer beans soak, the more the gas-producing compounds break down. Beans will double or triple in size, depending on which soaking method you use, so it’s important to use a large enough pot when soaking beans.
There are three soaking methods you can use, the Hot Soak Method, the Traditional Soak Method, and the Quick Soak Method. The Hot Soak Method is the recommended method because it reduces cooking time and gas-producing compounds the most and it produces consistently tender beans.
The Hot Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 10 cups of water for every 2 cups f beans.
2. Heat to boiling and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover and let stand for 4 to 24 hours.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Traditional Soak Method
1. Pour cold water over beans to cover.
2. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight.
3. Drain beans and discard soak water (NOTE: cold water starts but does not complete the rehydration process so the beans will appear wrinkled after soaking. They will fully rehydrate during cooking.)
4. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.
The Quick Soak Method
1. Place beans in a large pot and add 6 cups of water for every 2 cups of beans.
2. Bring to boil and boil for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.
3. Remove beans from heat, cover, and let stand for 1 hour.
4. Drain beans and discard soak water.
5. Rinse beans with fresh, cool water.

Cook Your Beans

Now that you’ve cleaned, rinsed, and soaked your beans, you can cook them, which is as easy as simmering beans in fresh water. You can prevent your beans from foaming and boiling over by adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the water. Beans generally take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook, depending on the variety. Check the Bean Reference Chart for cooking times.
Here are some other helpful hints for cooking beans:
  • Keep cooking water at a gentle simmer to prevent split skins.
  • Since beans expand as they cook, add warm water periodically during the cooking process to keep the beans covered.
  • Stir beans occasionally throughout the cooking process to prevent sticking.
  • Bite “test beans” for tenderness. Beans should be tender, but not mushy. If beans are not tender after the specified cooking time, the reason could be altitude, hard water or the age of the beans. Keep cooking and bite test for tenderness.
  • Drain beans immediately after they reach the desired tenderness to halt the cooking process and prevent over-cooking.
  • Onions may be added at any time during the cooking process. For a stronger onion flavor, add them during the last half-hour of cooking.
  • Herbs and spices like oregano, parsley, thyme, and garlic may be added at any time during cooking.
  • Wait to add lemon juice, vinegar, tomatoes, chili sauce, catsup, molasses, or wine until after beans have been soaked and are fully cooked. Adding ingredients rich in calcium or acids too early in the cooking process can prevent the beans from becoming tender.
- See more at: http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/cooking-with-dry-beans/#sthash.lOpAlznp.dpuf