Summer Time

June is lurking just around the garden gate. I seem to recall waiting ever so impatiently for spring to arrive.

It is said that the older one gets the faster time seems to pass, I can say with all knowing that this is factual.

My thought is... as we age we come to appreciate time as a gift to be cherished and not wished away.

Sooo, lots of new happenings in the gardens of Sage Hill Farms, no time to waste~

Juicy news: June apples, apricots, and peaches are on their way to maturity.

This is the first year for the apricot and peach to bear fruit, it's beautiful and healthy so far.

We are well into the new project of the Tennessee Native plant/grasses collection.

*Our first four have been planted and are looking good; three more waiting for the man with the shovel (it is after all his project).

*Rosa Carolina

A slender wild rose to 36 inches tall with straight, narrow thorns. The leaves are compound, with 5-7 dull green, coarsely toothed leaflets. The flowers are usually solitary, pink, and about 2 inches wide. Each blossom is composed of 5 petals with numerous yellow stamens in the center.

This common species can be found in dry woods, pastures, and fence rows throughout most of the eastern and central US and throughout Tennessee.

The Rosa genus includes perennial shrubs and woody vines with showy flowers. Wild roses have 5 petals, while cultivated roses have flowers with many overlapping layers of petals. Seven species are found in Tennessee.

Many parts of various Rosa species are edible, including the young shoots, petals, and the false fruits or rose hips, which may vary in size and flavor.

*Bee Balm (Monarda didyma)

A stunning native that has found a treasured place in horticulture as well. The flowers are specifically designed to be pollinated by hummingbirds, which find the flowers irresistible. The aromatic leaves were used as a tea substitute during the Boston Tea Party, which led to another common name, Oswego Tea.

I expect this plant to flower in June; it has grown a lot and has bud formations already.

*White Sage

An ancient healing herb, used most often for medicinal purposes...and while it isn't a native to TN, it is part of this project. Supposedly it is very hard to get established...we will see.

I'm waiting for the second blooming of the Lily bed...hopefully I can share those in the mid month "On Second Thought" issue.


I love Sharing Good News~

Published in the January 2010 edition of the Nutrition Journal, the multinational authors of the study analyzed over 3000 different foods from around the world and found that herbs and spices had by far the highest antioxidant content of all food groups. Some of the other foods that they analyzed included berries, beverages, cereals, chocolates, seafood, fruit, grains, legumes, meat, fish, nuts and seeds, vegetables and oils.

Commenting on their results they observed that: "Spices, herbs and supplements include the most antioxidant rich products in our study, some exceptionally high."

The analysis found that the culinary herbs and spices that have the greatest antioxidant content were clove, allspice, peppermint, cinnamon, oregano, thyme, sage and rosemary. Moreover the average antioxidant activity of spices was 300% higher than that of berries, 2300% greater than that of other fruit, 3600% higher than that of vegetables and 600% more than that of nuts.

These results back up a similar study published in the July 2006 edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In this earlier, smaller survey culinary herbs and spices were also found to have the highest antioxidant content of all food types.

The Not So Good ...in fact it stinks!

www.organicconsumers.org/monlink.cfm

Kagan. Isn't she supposed to be on the side of the peoples' best interest? www.capwiz.com/grassrootsnetroots/issues/alert/?alertid=15082126&type

I can't feel good about anyone who can uphold Monsanto in any fashion.

Something about poison in and on my food just gets my attention in a not so tolerant way.


Good To Know Tip:

Keep an Aloe plant growing for your summer needs of too much sun, bug bites, cuts and scratches.

Just break off a section, open it up and rub directly onto the spot of need...it has wonderful healing properties.


People and Places We Know and Love~

http://crememagnolia.com has a brand new server with all the options of a favorite wish. You are invited to join us and make it your favorite place to "Pay It Forward." And, network with some mighty minds.~

http://wemagazineforwomen.com is another very special place to meet and mingle with over the top business women.

You can find me there as Editor of the EarthWise column. (http://wemagazineforwomen.com/the-buzz-about-we-magazine/meet-the-editors) Always room for a few good women, the invitation is open.


June gives us Flag Day on the 14th - remember to fly it high and proudly.

Fathers Day on the 20th - a time to honor all the good men in our lives.

Summer Solstice, on June 21st is the longest day of the year, and the first day of summer for us in the United States. The summer solstice for the U.S. occurs at the time when the Earth is at a point in its orbit where the Northern Hemisphere is most tilted towards the sun.

Many cultural traditions are tied to the summer solstice. Some scientists believe that Stonehenge in England, is part of a huge astronomical calendar because Stonehenge's axis is roughly pointed in the direction of sunrise at the summer and winter solstice.

In England and Ireland the solstices and equinoxes do not mark the start of a season, as they do in the United States; rather they occur at the midpoint of their seasons. Summer for these countries starts on May 1 and ends on July 31and the summer solstice is called mid-summer.

The first of the new 2010 products are dried, blended, and ready for shipping...don't miss out on the best thing you can do for your health - add some chemical free herbs~ Visit today at www.sagehillfarmsandvintagestore.com/herbs.html

Wishing you each a beautiful and blessed Summer season.

Bea Kunz