NUMERO RECORDS
 
JR.010
Rokk: I Want To Live High
LP/Digital
19th August 2013
 
 
A debut album that never was, Rokk's I Want To Get High is that rare misshapen pearl clenched tightly between the shells of a music industry shucked long ago. Too soulful for its disco-era release date, the sextet's 1976 Tollie-issued 45 "Patience" tracked well in Rokk's hometown of Los Angeles, but was withdrawn before patience ran out with the spring rains of 1977. Tracked simultaneously was this entire shelved album full of Rokk’s mid-tempo grooves, flute-lead funk, sultry female backing vocals, slap bass, chorus-drenched guitars, and lyrics about getting baked and eating baked apple pie. Jazzy, with plentiful slices of Broadway, Innervisions, and Rokk's own stoned brand of horn-rock, had I Want To Get High ever gotten so high as actual record store shelves circa late 1977, it would've surely sobered up to the commercial onslaught of saturday night disco juggernauts and the pummeling forces of earth, wind, and fire.
 
Jr.011
Centaura: Lawdy, Lawdy Lawd
LP/Digital
9th September 2013
Warrior horse-woman of myth or chimerical beast of late 1970s funk? It is simply Centaura, available here for what amounts to the first time. For Atlanta hillbilly impresario Bob Riley, the “Spiral Series” of 12”s was part put-on, part hustle—but for Birmingham, Alabama’s Centaura, that spiral-in logo appeared as a long-shot leg up. Their record’s two-color, one-idea cover was mass-produced for Riley’s envisioned run of potential releases…though nothing but the enigmatic Centaura ever filled the jacket—and just barely. Recorded in 1978, Lawdy, Lawdy, Lawd is a long-playing Golden Fleece of funk, disco, boogie, and deep post-Muscle Shoals balladry that would’ve surely failed to exist without Riley’s extreme penny-pinching tactics in service of a failed marketing ploy so ludicrous, it kept the LP out of stores, relegated to extreme scarcity forever. On Side One, Jesse Daniel and Cedrich Rutledge trade energized beats and freaks, before the synth-washed slowdown of “One of a Kind." Side Two features Riley’s two textbook funk cuts and album-ender “Just Don’t Love You"—a mysterious tack-on of the Carbon Copies' Git Down Inc.-issued 45, plus a heaving “Distant Lover” that sexes Marvin Gaye’s original into softcore porn territory.
 
NUM047
Eccentric Soul: The Forte Label
2LP/CD/Digital
9th September 2013
 
In 1969, after three years as Soul Sister #1 to James Brown’s touring entourage, Marva Whitney came home to Kansas City, putting Ellis Taylor’s Forte label back at full fighting strength. She’d calmed aching crowds the day after MLK’s death, and she’d lived the life, despite its rigors—to pour out her pain and exuberance on Forte sides including “I’ve Lived The Life” and “Daddy Don’t Know About Sugar Bear,” which made national rounds in 1972. By then, Forte had already done more than deliver Marvelous Marva to market. Taylor worked overtime at KPRS to bring the world The Rayons, who’d stroll their girl group harmonies past Chicago’s RCA studios on “Baby Be Good.” In ’68, The Four Darlings sauntered in with smoky-voiced soul operatics on the demanding “Give Me Love.” Progressing in the middle ’70s, Everyday People got “Super Black” on Forte’s pine-green label. Still powering forward some 13 years on, Forte redawned with the 1980s, essaying disco funk with Sharon Revoal’s “Reaching for Our Star.”
 
Numero 047 Eccentric Soul: The Forte Label charts Kansas City yeoman’s work, the Carpets and the Derbys, dapper clothiers mysteriously murdered, and marriages made and broken. In 28 tracks, plus a trove of promo headshots and every-hued label scans detailing all iterations of Forte’s logo in print, this 16th Eccentric Soul sojourn hands over vivid floor shakers and lost dance craze records alike—though what moves “The Hen” required remains anyone’s guess.
 
NUM202.2 
Unwound: Kid Is Gone
3 LP
23rd September 2013
 
Kid Is Gone is the unquiet portrait of primal Unwound. Before 1993’s Fake Train ripped through, they’d been Giant Henry, Supertanker, and Cygnus X-1, short-lived black holes gathering dark material into something built to explode. From Justin Trosper, Vern Rumsey, and Brandt Sandeno’s first restive years, “Crab Nebula” might’ve best prepared the indie-sphere for what Unwound became, had Sandeno’s split not stalled their planned debut.
 
Part 1 in Numero’s 4-part reissue project, Kid Is Gone documents signal chaos in Olympia’s fertile scene before Unwound’s turbulent noise hit stride, in unrevealed period photos, 34 tracks, and three LPs—cassette-only demos, early 7”s, a KAOS radio broadcast, material tracked live in a local basement, and all of what became 1994’s Unwound, on which the band’s prehistory plays out in a feral maelstrom of screaming, distortion, feedback, and abrasive promise.
 
 
 
 
NUM 050
Purple Snow: Forecasting The Minneapolis Sound
4LP+Book/2CD+Book/Digital
11th November 2013
 
 
Bubbling up from the snow-blanketed land of 10,000 lakes, the Minneapolis Sound defied expectations, emerging late in the ‘70s as a slick, black, and technologically advanced fusion of funk and rock. Purple Snow, the Numero Group’s ambitious 50th mainline release, chronicles false starts and strident early steps toward the Minneapolis Sound, on 4 LPs (or 2CDs) and 32 rare and unreleased recordings from the years just prior to, and just after, one gifted Nelson was crowned Prince. At some 30,000 words, the accompanying 144-page hardbound book meticulously directs the listener through two hours of music, a decade dotted by adept producers, combos, and characters whose less celebrated groundwork put Minneapolis’ purple launchpad on the map. From Jimmy Jam’s extroverted Mind & Matter collective to Andre Cymone’s polish-free bedroom demos, Purple Snow gathers as the sprawling, nonfiction prequel to Purple Rain’s cultural takeover. In image-rich splendour, funk-informed hordes of unsung Twin Cities talent bask for a spotlit moment, out of that persistent violet shadow, to shine. 
 
 
Gold Star PR
Wyastone Business Park, Wyastone Leys, Monmouth, NP25 3SR
Tel: 01600 892 690
email: nita.keeler@gmail.com

    
 
 

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